Apollo

Apollo killing Niobes. Detail from an Athenian red-figure clay vase, about 475-425 BC. Paris, Musée du Louvre G341Apollo with Muses in a chariot. Detail from a 'Melian' (Parian) amphora from Melos. Athens 3961.Phocis Locris coin <I>Rev.</I> Delphi, c. 336 BC. Athens

A god, son of Zeus and Leto, with his twin Artemis. He is the god of the major sanctuaries on Delos, and at Delphi, where he gave 'oracles', answering questions set him by any visitor on either personal or state affairs, and saw to the purification of, for example, Orestes. To the Greeks he represented the Rule of Law. He is often shown with a bow, lyre or kithara, and laurel wreath or branch, and is bearded only in early Archaic art. With his sister Artemis he fights against Herakles (stealing his Delphic tripod), they kill the children of Niobe (who boasted of the size of her family), and support the Trojans in the Trojan War. He is the god of music, and later he is especially associated with the Muses.

Above left: Apollo killing Niobes. Detail from an Athenian red-figure clay vase, about 475-425 BC. Paris, Musée du Louvre G341 © Musée du Louvre, Paris Licence Plate 11 UK 1007 112

Above middle: Apollo with Muses in a chariot. Detail from a 'Melian' (Parian) amphora from Melos. Athens 3961. © Athens, National Museum Licence Plate 11 UK 1007 113

Above right: Phocis Locris coin Rev. Delphi, c. 336 BC. Athens © Kraay and Hirmer pl. 147,462